Songbirds:

Nestlings:

 

When birds are hatched they are naked or partially feathered with eyes closed. They are called nestlings, until they are feathered and ready to leave the nest. If you should find a nestling bird on the ground that is opening its mouth for food when approached, the nestling can be returned to the nest only if it is safe to do so.

  • If it is unsafe to put the nestling back in the nest, or if the nestling is not opening its mouth when approached and eyes are closed it may be injured and needs immediate care, call a wildlife rehabilitation center or the Pennsylvania Game Commission immediately. 
  • If a nest with active nestling birds is found on the ground; wear disposable gloves, take the nestlings out of the nest and cup them in your or someone’s gloved hands to keep them warm. Prepare a plastic basket or container not much larger than the nest, by poking holes in the bottom for drainage and threading wire through. Secure the container near the trunk of a tree and where foliage is covering or partially covering the sight of the container. Place the nest in the container, as long as the nesting material is dry, ensuring that the sides of the container are no higher than the height of the nest. If the nest is wet, put dry straw forming it into a nest shape in the container.  Place the warmed birds in the nest. Go inside a building or car, and watch continuously for one hour to see if the parents are coming back to the nest. If they do, you have helped reunite the babies with the parents.

If no adults return, prepare a box not much larger than the bird, by poking holes in the sides for ventilation. Place a close knit material in the bottom of the box, such as a pillowcase or rag. Wearing gloves, place the bird in the box, secure the lid and place the box in a dark, warm, quiet and undisturbed place. Do not attempt to give the nestling food or water. Call a wildlife rehabilitation center or the Pennsylvania Game Commission immediately for further instruction

Fledglings:

 

When birds are ready to leave the nest, or are pushed out, they are usually fully feathered, have their eyes open, and are found hopping on the ground. They are still dependent on their parents to feed them so may be calling to be fed. This is normal behavior. Please leave the bird alone, unless there are dangers, such as pets. The bird can be placed on a low lying branch near where it was found. Take pets indoors, and have children play in another area, just for a day or two, until the fledgling has built up strength enough to fly. 

  • Do not try to place the fledgling back in the nest for fear the other birds may jump out of the nest prematurely.

If the fledgling has been bitten, or carried by a dog or cat; or if the fledgling is falling over as it tries to hop. Prepare a box not much larger than the bird, by poking holes in the sides for ventilation. Place a close knit material in the bottom of the box, such as a pillowcase or rag. Wearing gloves, place the bird in the box, secure the lid and place the box in a dark, warm, quiet and undisturbed place.  Do not attempt to give the fledgling food or water.  Call a wildlife rehabilitation center or the Pennsylvania Game Commission immediately for further instruction.  

Adults:

 

The most frequently incidences that adults birds are injured is when they are attacked by cats, hit by cars and fly into windows.

In all these cases the bird will need to be treated as soon as possible. In the meantime prepare a box not much larger than the bird, by poking holes in the sides for ventilation. Place a close knit material in the bottom of the box, such as a pillowcase or rag, place the bird in the box, secure the lid and place the box in a dark, warm, quiet and undisturbed place.

Do not attempt to give the bird any food or water. Call a wildlife rehabilitation center or the Pennsylvania Game Commission.